PROUT Progressive Utilization Theory

 

A theory is an exposition of the general principles that govern some aspect of life. Hence, every theory must have a function. Generally speaking, that function may be either explanatory or practical, though in fact any successful theory must necessarily be both. True knowledge is always both useful and usable information.

 

As PROUT is a socio-economic theory, its purpose is to facilitate the happiness and welfare of all. The Five Fundamental Principles of PROUT embody both the practical and theoretical essence of this theory.

 

In a nutshell, the theory is that an ideal society makes progressive utilization of everything. Though the concept of progressive utilization sounds obvious, its implications require some amplification. Hence, the theory is broken down into five fundamental principles.

 

Each of the principles enlarges on the preceding principles. In other words, Principle 2 becomes practical after applying Principle 1. Principle 3 becomes practical after applying Principles 1 and 2. In this way, each successive principle not only adds insight into the theory of progressive utilization, but it also adds dimensions to the principles that precede it.

 

We may liken the practical aspects of PROUT to a lotus flower having five layers of petals. The outermost layer corresponds to the first principle, and the innermost layer corresponds to the fifth principle.

 

The Five Fundamental Principles of PROUT are:

 

1. There should be no accumulation of wealth without the permission of society.

 

2. There should be maximum utilization and rational distribution of the crude, subtle, and causal resources.

 

3. There should be maximum utilization of the physical, mental, and spiritual potentialities of the individual and collective beings.

 

4. There should be a well-balanced adjustment among the crude, subtle, and causal utilizations.

 

5. Utilizations vary in accordance with time, space, and form; the utilizations should be progressive.